Alcohol and the Body

With holidays like Christmas and New Year just around the corner, we can expect to spend a lot of time at parties, getting together with friends and family, and yes, drinking booze. There are many ways that alcohol can affect you in your fitness and wellness journey.

It is a common outcome from many studies that increasing alcohol intake also increases weight gain. Alcohol very commonly causes abdominal bloating, diarrhea, and an array of other issues. Even one instance of excessive drinking can cause permanent damage to the digestive tract.

Excessive drinking can also have a bad effect on your heart, causing irregular heart beats and heart failure. Drinking alcohol can reduce your body’s ability to fight off viruses, so you are more likely to get sick. Alcohol is a diuretic as well, so make sure to drink lots of water to counteract the dehydration that comes along with drinking. For a more complete breakdown of how alcohol affects all of the systems in the body, go to Healthline.com.

Now let’s discuss the psychological problems that can arise from drinking. Alcohol tends to have poor effects on productivity. This is naturally counter-productive to fitness goals. It takes an incredible amount of self-discipline to get up off our butts to do some exercise or some meal prep. The depressant has a way of sucking all of the motivation out of you, and you need a lot of motivation to reach your fitness goals. A hangover isn’t going to help anyone get out of bed in the morning to go to the gym.

Some have said that drinking in small amounts can improve heart health, but studies are inconclusive. However, we are sure that drinking over the recommended amount is not beneficial to your health.

The recommended amount of alcohol is no more than 21 drinks per week for men, and not more than 4 drinks in one day. For women, it is recommended to drink less than 14 drinks per week, and not more than 3 drinks in a day. Pregnant women should avoid alcohol entirely. If anyone drinks more than the recommended amount in one day, they should not drink for 48 hours in order to let the liver recover. For more on the process rate of the liver and alcohol portion recommendations, go to Patient.info.

I hope you enjoyed this post and have gained a little bit of insight on how best to approach your holiday partying. Just please remember to not drink and drive. You can always call a cab, or sleep it off in your car. There is no reason to put yourself or others in danger.


Sources

http://www.healthline.com/health/alcohol/effects-on-body

http://www.hamsnetwork.org/hangovercures/

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1530-0277.1998.tb04381.x/abstract

http://patient.info/health/recommended-safe-limits-of-alcohol

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/5/1312.short

https://www.glassdoor.com/blog/dos-donts-office-holiday-party/

http://playmalaysiagolf.com/homepage/hello-world/

 

 

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